In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the role of oxidative stress (or free-radical damage) and how the body responds to inflammation, in the brains of people with Parkinson’s.  These ‘stressor’ factors create an environment which is not conducive to normal function and signs of oxidative damage have been shown to appear long before nerve cells (neurons) actually deteriorate in Parkinson’s

  • Oxidative stress is essentially an imbalance between the production of chemically reactive substances in cells and the ability of the body to counteract or detoxify their harmful effects, resulting in cell damage or cell death.
  • Inflammation is the body’s attempt at self-healing; the aim being to remove harmful substances, including damaged or dying cells, and begin the healing process. When something harmful affects a part of the body, the biological response to try to remove it results in the signs and symptoms of inflammation.

Strong evidence now exists to support abnormal mitochondrial activity and increased oxidative stress, in the cause, development and effects of Parkinson’s. Mitochondria are small structures inside cells that are responsible for energy production. A complex relationship occurs between mitochondria and other cellular processes that affect cell survival, as mitochondria are also the main source of waste products in cells. There is also a plausible link between oxidative damage and the formation of abnormal clumps of protein that are characteristic of Parkinson’s – oxidative damage is believed to play a part in the formation of misfolded alpha-synuclein and prevention of the proper breakdown of this clumped toxic protein.

There is now a great deal of research going on to explore methods of reducing the inflammation response in an effort to restrict the potential damage inflicted, and this, in turn, has led to a number of clinical trials.


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Webinars

Webinar: Inflammation and Parkinson’s

Held in partnership with the University of Edinburgh and the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, with Edinburgh University’s Professor Tilo Kunath as chair. This hour-long webinar is for the Parkinson’s…

Microglia

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Time to ROCK-PD

Researchers in Germany are conducting a new phase 2 clinical trial to determine if an existing cardiovascular drug called fasudil, could help people with Parkinson’s.

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Phase 2 clinical trial of dapansutrile for Parkinson’s confirmed

Cure Parkinson’s, in partnership with Van Andel Institute, is delighted to announce funding for a Phase 2 clinical of dapansutrile, an anti-inflammatory drug, to determine whether it can slow…

Research events

Spring Research Update meeting 2024: watch again

Our Spring Research Update Meeting once again took place at the renowned Royal Society of Medicine, Wimpole Street, London where we invited guests to an inspiring agenda of some…

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A Review of Our 2023 Preclinical Projects

In 2023, Cure Parkinson’s has funded five new preclinical projects. These preclinical projects address a wide range of ‘targets’ to understand which drugs and which targets should be further…

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Sun Pharma shines on c-ABL

Sun Pharma have published data on their new drug vodobatinib which is a c-ABL inhibitor – c-ABL is over-active in the brains of people with Parkinson’s.

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Biotech Inhibikase develops new drug for Parkinson’s

Researchers have published laboratory data demonstrating the neuroprotective effects of a new potential drug for Parkinson’s called IkT-148009.

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Results of FAIRPARK-II deferiprone trial published

The results of the most recent study of deferiprone in people with Parkinson’s (the FAIRPARK-II study) have been published in the New England Journal of Medicine. 

Azathioprine in Parkinson's

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A sub-study of azathioprine in Parkinson’s

There is increasing evidence that inflammation and the immune system might have contributory roles in the development and progression of Parkinson’s.

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Inhibikase makes a case for c-Abl

Research has suggested that in some cases of Parkinson’s a protein called c-Abl tyrosine kinase is abnormally over-active and this contributes to nerve cell inflammation and eventual cell death….

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Nicotinamide riboside for Parkinson’s: pilot results published

Researchers in Norway have published the promising results of a pilot clinical study of nicotinamide riboside for people with Parkinson’s.

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The PROSEEK trial of KO706

Sun Pharma Advanced Research Company (SPARC) is conducting a phase 2 clinical trial to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of its experimental c-Abl inhibitor KO706 in people with early…

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Encouraging trial results from Anavex

Recent positive results from biotech company Anavex Life Sciences have shown that when treated with their experimental drug, blarcamesine, individuals with Parkinson’s dementia had significant improvements in both motor…

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Iron and the brain

Recent studies exploring iron levels in the brains of people with Parkinson’s have shown important implications for its use as a biomarker, as well as a way of potentially…

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Rheumatoid arthritis and Parkinson’s

Recently, researchers have asked whether there is an association between Parkinson’s and rheumatoid arthritis: Could people with rheumatoid arthritis be at higher risk of developing Parkinson’s?

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Cure Parkinson’s approves funding for new iron removing drug

Cure Parkinson’s continues to champion iron chelation for Parkinson’s. Trustees have now awarded a grant to develop the next generation of iron reducing drugs.

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The need for novel c-Abl inhibitors

A protein called Abelson Tyrosine Kinase – or c-Abl – is believed to be involved in the biological processes leading to loss of dopamine neurons in the brains of people with Parkinson’s. In…